Please Enjoy.

Es ist mir Wurst

26 notes

Anonymous asked: I refuse to believe no one actually hit on or flirt with Hisoka or Illumi in that bar scene. Well at least get eyed on. I mean come on.

paristanhill:

Well Hisoka and Illumi aren’t exactly the most approachable of people, but I wouldn’t be surprised if there were a few people glancing over at them from a distance.

image

10 notes

Ran 16 miles- farthest I’ve ever run! Good job me.
I started at 5:50am. As I was leaving I talked to my neighbor, Smurph, the local drug dealer, who was just getting home from a long night. The streets are so silent during that hour. There are only a few types of people out, those who wake up early for work, and those who are just ending the party from the previous night. 
On lake shore drive I ran into a jillion other lady runners, and only after running with them for a mile asked what the event was. Apparently there was the women’s half marathon today- I bet they all did really well. I ran with them from miles 9-11, it was a really nice pick me up. 
About mile 13 I started thinking I was going to give up, or at least my body wanted to. But I had set my mind to it you know, like, even though I hated running I just had to keep going. 
I kept thinking ‘It’s just pain. it’s just pain. it’s just pain.” Plus I was really appreciating how every part of my clothes were totally drenched in sweat. I earned that. I produced all of that. All my leg muscles, that’s all pain and work I put in. Those leg muscles are mine! I did them! Anyway, obviously I’m not being poetic but it’s super cool. 
So I did the thing where I was like, five miles is just 2.5 twice. 4 miles is just 2 miles twice, all the way up to the last half mile. The last half mile is just a quarter mile, and then another quarter mile. Which, actually, was the hardest part. 
I’ve run 15.5 miles, but this last half mile- HOW CAN I DO IT.
You understand.
Then I went to church and now I’m going to take a nap. A serious nap.

Ran 16 miles- farthest I’ve ever run! Good job me.

I started at 5:50am. As I was leaving I talked to my neighbor, Smurph, the local drug dealer, who was just getting home from a long night. The streets are so silent during that hour. There are only a few types of people out, those who wake up early for work, and those who are just ending the party from the previous night. 

On lake shore drive I ran into a jillion other lady runners, and only after running with them for a mile asked what the event was. Apparently there was the women’s half marathon today- I bet they all did really well. I ran with them from miles 9-11, it was a really nice pick me up. 

About mile 13 I started thinking I was going to give up, or at least my body wanted to. But I had set my mind to it you know, like, even though I hated running I just had to keep going. 

I kept thinking ‘It’s just pain. it’s just pain. it’s just pain.” Plus I was really appreciating how every part of my clothes were totally drenched in sweat. I earned that. I produced all of that. All my leg muscles, that’s all pain and work I put in. Those leg muscles are mine! I did them! Anyway, obviously I’m not being poetic but it’s super cool. 

So I did the thing where I was like, five miles is just 2.5 twice. 4 miles is just 2 miles twice, all the way up to the last half mile. The last half mile is just a quarter mile, and then another quarter mile. Which, actually, was the hardest part. 

I’ve run 15.5 miles, but this last half mile- HOW CAN I DO IT.

You understand.

Then I went to church and now I’m going to take a nap. A serious nap.

Filed under personal runblr running chicago marathon training marathon training womens half marathon sixteen miles it's just pain

947 notes

historical-nonfiction:

Photographs from The North American Indian, a 20-volume work published between 1907 and 1930, filled with over 1,500 photographs as well as records of tribal lore and history, biographical sketches, and descriptions of traditional foods, housing, clothing, ceremonies, and customs. American photographer Edward S. Curtis wanted to capture all he could before it vanished. The pictures cover almost all of the USA, even the ice along the Arctic Ocean and the desert border with Mexico. While painting an idealized picture, Curtis’ images also contrasted with the public’s perception of Native Americans as impediments to be moved off useful land.

(Source: curtis.library.northwestern.edu)

5,375 notes

24,833 Plays
National Museum of Denmark
Drømde mik en drøm i nat

green-witch-uprooted:

crayonic:

For people who are actually interested in how viking music might have sounded, “Drømde mik en drøm i nat" (/I dreamt a dream last night) is the earliest music (and lyrics) known in Scandinavia preserved on the last page of the (~1200-1300) Codex Runicus as rune notes.

The song and melody is still known and used today in most of Scandinavia, as a sort of folk-standard. This version, deceivingly slow in the beginning, is presented as close to the original sound of the years 900-1000 as historians think they can come.

This song might have survived because it was a gigantic hit, like the viking’s very own “Billie Jean”. A total pop slayer that stayed around long enough for music notes to be invented.

The more you know.

Cool as hell

(Source: culturenordic.com, via professorsparklepants)

3 notes

My day is going pretty well, just editing the millions of photos I have from the Muforga Primary School (that school in Mozambique I’m making a yearbook for). 

It’s great because I get to look at picture of adorable kids, but hard because I have to make the tough calls. Like, which picture is the best of each kid. They are all so cute looking! Why aren’t I still in Mozambique organizing a theatre group for these kids?! In this post is just two, TWO, of the difficult choices. There are 650 other kids all with multiple photos. Anyway, it’s a nice problem to have. 

Next up: going for a run, and then buying white nail polish for the fall season. It’s hard to find a neutral color that doesn’t accentuate the strong red undertones in my skin. 

Filed under personal muforaga mozambique chimoio

510 notes

npr:

NPR’s Michel Martin was invited by St. Louis Public Radio to moderate an intensely emotional community conversation around race, police tactics and leadership.

Rev. Willis Johnson, the pastor of Wellspring Church, hosted a community conversation Thursday night that drew about 200 people to the church. In welcoming the audience, Johnson acknowledged he’s “gone from feeling hurt, to wanting to hurt,” but he said he hoped the event would be a step to healing a “community in trauma.”

Plea To Ferguson’s Leaders: To Help Heal, Acknowledge Our Hurt

Photo credit: Whitney Curtis for NPR